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Test of hydrogen storage cavern at Gasunie's Hystock site

Technicians prepare a gas-sealing test above an underground cavern at a hydrogen energy project inside Gasunie's HyStock site in Veendam, the Netherlands. The underground cavern, formerly used to store natural gas, will now be used to house hydrogen. Each cavern is around 300 - 400 metres high and 50 - 80 metres wide, big enough to contain the Eiffel Tower. Since hydrogen molecule is much smaller than that of natural gas, engineers have to apply additional sealing to prevent leakage. The technicians are inserting a pipe to pump nitrogen, which is more inert than hydrogen, into the cavern for testing.

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Cavern_Gasunie_Netherlands-009-JIN07776-AL.jpg
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Justin Jin
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3000x2001 / 1.9MB
Technicians prepare a gas-sealing test above an underground cavern at a hydrogen energy project inside Gasunie's HyStock site in Veendam, the Netherlands.  The underground cavern, formerly used to store natural gas, will now be used to house hydrogen.   Each cavern is around 300 - 400 metres high and 50 - 80 metres wide, big enough to contain the Eiffel Tower.   Since hydrogen molecule is much smaller than that of natural gas, engineers have to apply additional sealing to prevent leakage.  The technicians are inserting a pipe to pump nitrogen, which is more inert than hydrogen, into the cavern for testing.